Sunday Times Books LIVE Community Sign up

Login to Sunday Times Books LIVE

Forgotten password?

Forgotten your password?

Enter your username or email address and we'll send you reset instructions

Sunday Times Books LIVE

Jacana

@ Sunday Times Books LIVE

Archive for the ‘Namibia’ Category

Understanding Namibia: Join Henning Melber in Conversation with Alfredo Tjiurimo Hengari in Pretoria

Understanding Namibia: The trials of independenceThe University of Pretoria Department of Political Sciences invites you to a conversation on the Jacana Media publication Understanding Namibia: The trials of independence by Henning Melber.

On Monday, 1 June, Melber will be in conversation with Namibian political commentator and senior research fellow in the Foreign Policy Programme of the South African Institute of International Affairs, Alfredo Tjiurimo Hengari.

The event will take place at the Hatfield Campus of the University of Pretoria and starts at at 12 PM.

See you there!

Event Details

  • Date: Monday, 1 June 2015
  • Time: 12 to 1:30 PM
  • Venue: University Of Pretoria
    Postgraduate Centre, Hatfield Campus
    Corner of Lynnwood and University Roads
    Pretoria | Map
  • Interviewer: Tjiurimo Hengari
  • RSVP: Relebone Myambo, rsvp@jacana.co.za

Book Details


» read article

Henning Melber Presents Understanding Namibia, an Exploration of the Nation’s Trials and Triumphs

Understanding NamibiaNew from Jacana, Understanding Namibia: The trials of independence by Henning Melber:

On 28 November 2014 Namibians will hold their fifth democratic parliamentary and presidential elections. Since independence in 1990, Namibia has witnessed only one generation with no memory of colonialism – the ‘born frees’, who voted in the 2009 elections – and the overwhelming dominance of the former anti-colonial liberation movement, SWAPO, has remained undisturbed. This is the context the book Understanding Namibia sets out to unpack, exploring the achievements and failures of the country, and contrasting the narrative of a post-colonial patriotic history with the socio-economic and political realities of the nation-building project.

Henning Melber investigates whether, notwithstanding the relative stability prevailing to date, the negotiation of controlled change during Namibia’s decolonisation could have achieved more than simply a replacement of those in control.

‘Henning Melber has unrivalled knowledge of Namibia since independence. This significant book offers an up-to-date and thoroughgoing analysis of the country and its prospects.’ – Christopher Saunders, Emeritus Professor of History at the University of Cape Town, South Africa and co-author of South Africa: A Modern History.

While those in power declare their support for a free, fair and just society, the limits to liberation are such that emancipation from foreign rule has only partially been achieved. As a scholar activist who was part of the anticolonial movement, Melber demonstrates this painful journey and the limits to liberation.

About the author

Henning Melber, the son of German immigrants to Namibia, joined SWAPO in 1974. He was Director of the Namibian Economic Policy Research Unit (NEPRU) in Windhoek, Research Director of the Nordic Africa Institute and Executive Director of the Dag Hammarskjöld Foundation, both in Uppsala. He is Senior Advisor to the Foundation and Extraordinary Professor at the Department of Political Sciences at the University of Pretoria and the Centre for Africa Studies at the University of the Free State in Bloemfontein, South Africa.

Book details


» read article

Excerpt from A History of Namibia by Marion Wallace with John Kinahan

A History of NamibiaIn A History of Namibia Marion Wallace and John Kinahan trace the country’s development from its beginnings, all the way through to 1990. In this excerpt, shared by Namibiana Buchdepot, they discuss the years from 1894 to 1903, when Namibia was under German rule.

Read the excerpt:

On 1 January 1894, Theodor Leutwein arrived in SWA to replace Curt von Francois as the head of the colonial administration (rudimentary as it was). The balance of power was now to swing decisively in favour of the colonisers for the first time. By the end of 1896 Leutwein had quelled immediate opposition to German occupation, concluded agreements with those groups that had previously held aloof from Goring and von Francois, and begun to set up the structures of colonial rule. In the following year, African pastoralists were devastated by the epidemic of rinderpest. Thus the conditions for colonial development were created: for the first time, German settlers arrived in South West Africa in some numbers, and an infrastructure of roads, railways and harbours began to be created.

Book details


» read article

Podcast: Clive Walker Discusses the Proposal for a Once Off Sale of SA’s Rhino Horn

The Rhino KeepersClive Walker, co-author of The Rhino Keepers: Struggle for Survival, joined a discussion on rhino poaching with Albi Modise, Chief Director of Communications at the Department of Environmental Affairs, on Talk Radio 702 with Jenny Crwys-Williams.

Walker said that he was surprised to hear that the government is considering a once off sale of the rhino horn stock and said he thought that there should have been a meeting called for all the concerned parties to discuss this, as he and his son, Anton Walker, suggested in their book. He said that a rational discussion is needed between all the different groups before a decision is made.

Book details

eBook options – Download now!



» read article

Wildlife Photographer Shem Compion Presents the Insider’s Guide

Insider\'s GuideJacana presents wildlife photographer Shem Compion’s Insider’s Guide: Top Wildlife Photography Spots in Botswana and Namibia:

Inspired by Africa’s unique beauty, Shem Compion, in the second instalment of a three-part series, explores the best photography spots in Botswana and Namibia. This book provides a comprehensive guide to visiting some of the most remote destinations in the world. The daunting questions of when to go, how to get there, where to stay and what to do are quickly answered. The detailed and instructive photographic notes provide up-to-date information on the vital technical aspects of photography. In addition, this book is a guide to understanding animal behaviour – a photographer’s greatest asset.

Insider’s Guide uncovers the wonders of Botswana from the Okavango Delta, Deception Valley, to the Northern Tuli Game Reserve and many more. In Namibia, discover the splendour of the Southern Deserts, the lesser known locations in Etosha National Park as well as the Caprivi Strip. This is an essential guide for photographers, nature enthusiasts and travel junkies to begin their exploration into the vast and beautiful expanses of Botswana and Namibia.

About the author

Shem Compion has dedicated his life to his two passions – photography and nature. This dedication has made him a world-renowned photographer who has had his images published in many iconic magazines. In 2010 Shem supplied all 56 images to the Africa Geographic for the wildlife calendar which went on to sell out within 2 months, the first time it has done so. He has also been the recipient of numerous photographic awards such as winning the birds category in 2009 at the Getaway-Fuji awards.

Book details


» read article

Introducing Marion Wallace’s A History of Namibia

A History of NamibiaIn 1990 Namibia gained its independence after a decades-long struggle against South African rule – and, before that, against German colonialism. This book, the first new scholarly general history of Namibia in two decades, provides a fresh synthesis of these events, and of the much longer pre-colonial period.

A History of Namibia opens with a chapter by John Kinahan covering the evidence of human activity in Namibia from the earliest times to the nineteenth century, and for the first time making a synthesis of current archaeological research widely available to non-specialists. In subsequent chapters, Marion Wallace weaves together the most up-to-date academic research (in English and German) on Namibian history, from the mid-eighteenth century to the present. She explores histories of migration, production and power in the pre-colonial period, the changes triggered by European expansion, and the dynamics of the period of formal colonialism. The coverage of German rule includes a full chapter on the genocide of 1904-8. Here, Wallace outlines the history and historiography of the wars fought in central and southern Namibia, and the subsequent mass imprisonment of defeated Africans in concentration camps.

The final two chapters analyse the period of African nationalism, apartheid and war between 1946 and 1990. The book’s conclusion looks briefly at the development of Namibia in the two decades since independence. A History of Namibia provides an invaluable introduction and reference source to the past of a country that is often neglected, despite its significance in the history of the region and, indeed, for that of European colonialism and international relations. It makes accessible the latest research on the country, illuminates current controversies, puts forward new insights, and suggests future directions for research. The book’s extensive bibliography adds to its usefulness for scholar and general reader alike.

About the Author

Marion Wallace is African curator at the British Library and a historian of Namibia.

Book details


» read article

New Release of A History of Namibia by Marion Wallace

A History of NamibiaIn 1990 Namibia gained its independence after a decades-long struggle against South African rule – and, before that, against German colonialism. A History of Namibia: From the Beginning to 1990, the first new scholarly general history of Namibia in two decades, provides a fresh synthesis of these events, and of the much longer pre-colonial period. A History of Namibia opens with a chapter by John Kinahan covering the evidence of human activity in Namibia from the earliest times to the nineteenth century, and for the first time making a synthesis of current archaeological research widely available to non-specialists.

In subsequent chapters, Marion Wallace weaves together the most up-to-date academic research (in English and German) on Namibian history, from the mid-eighteenth century to the present. She explores histories of migration, production and power in the pre-colonial period, the changes triggered by European expansion, and the dynamics of the period of formal colonialism. The coverage of German rule includes a full chapter on the genocide of 1904-8. Here, Wallace outlines the history and historiography of the wars fought in central and southern Namibia, and the subsequent mass imprisonment of defeated Africans in concentration camps. The final two chapters analyse the period of African nationalism, apartheid and war between 1946 and 1990.

The book’s conclusion looks briefly at the development of Namibia in the two decades since independence. A History of Namibia provides an invaluable introduction and reference source to the past of a country that is often neglected, despite its significance in the history of the region and, indeed, for that of European colonialism and international relations. It makes accessible the latest research on the country, illuminates current controversies, puts forward new insights, and suggests future directions for research. The book’s extensive bibliography adds to its usefulness for scholar and general reader alike.

About the author

Marion Wallace is African curator at the British Library and a historian of Namibia.

Book details


» read article

Paul Trewhela Calls Up the Thami Zulu Question and Pays Tribute to a Fallen Heroine, Panduleni Kali

Inside QuatroPaul Trewhela wants to straighten out the facts regarding Umkhonto we Sizwe commander Thami Zulu’s death. This comes as a response to a column written by Jeremy Gordin in which Gordin writes that “it was unknown who actually administered poison to TZ (if it was poison that killed him). Trewhela says that Gordin’s statement, drawn from Gordin’s reading of Trewhela’s Inside Quatro: Uncovering the Exile History of the ANC and SWAPO is incorrect.

Rather it is very much undisputed that TZ (as he was known) was poisoned (an examination of his stomach contents revealed traces of diazinon, an organic phosphorus pesticide). Also, Trewhela clarifies that though it is true that it is unknown who administered the poison, this is not because the individual responsible cannot be found, but rather, because a formal investigation is yet to take place:

Jeremy Gordin’s column, “The Justice Malala Question” (Politicsweb, 27 October), creates more confusion than clarity in relation to the death of the Umkhonto we Sizwe commander, Thami Zulu (real name, Muziwakhe Ngwenya, also known as TZ), in Lusaka on 16 November 1989, three months before the unbanning of the ANC.

Gordin states “it was unknown who actually administered poison to TZ (if it was poison that killed him)”.

The first half of this sentence is true. The second half is false.

Meanwhile, Trewhela’s been active on other fronts. Here’s his obituary for Panduleni Kali, a Namibian political activist who survived brutal torture and imprisonment at the hands of SWAPO, the very party to which she had dedicated her life:

Panduleni Kali was an outstanding and emblematic woman of contemporary southern Africa. Her life embodied the schizophrenic contradictions of the region, torn between suffering and modernity. Kali was chief statistician in the Division of Labour Market Information in the Ministry of Labour and Social Welfare, but her distinguished professional service was remarkable for having taken shape after a terrible experience when she and her twin sister, Ndamona, were in their 20s.

For almost six years in the 1980s, the twin sisters and well over a hundred other Namibian women endured torture and imprisonment in pits in southern Angola at the hands of men who led the organisation to which they had dedicated their youthful political energies, the South West African People’s Organisation (Swapo). Since 1990 Swapo has been the sole governing party of Namibia; over the previous 24 years it had been engaged in a guerrilla war against white South African rule.

  • Book details


  • » read article

    David Lush Interviews Inside Quatro Author, Paul Trewhela

    Inside QuatroDavid Lush chats to author Paul Trewhela about the significance of his book Inside Quatro in today’s South Africa.

    While Inside Quatro documents meticulously the abuses of the ANC and Swapo in exile, there is little reflection or analysis on what implications these abuses have had for the ANC and Swapo’s governance of South Africa and Namibia respectively. Wasn't this a missed opportunity?

    PT: Primarily the book has an historical character, though with open-ended relevance to the present and the future. The two most important chapters in the book, in my view (chapters 2 and 11), are not ones written by me, but give first-hand accounts of the experience in exile in the ANC and Swapo camps. As I explain in the Introduction, all but four of the 14 chapters are from Searchlight South Africa, which was banned in South Africa. While available to academics, and quite widely cited in various publications since then, these texts have not been available to the general public until now.

    Book details


    » read article

    Gay in Africa: a Discussion

    To Have and to Hold.jpgSouth Africa’s laws protect the rights of gay and lesbian people. But what of other countries on the continent? African activists discuss the situation

    The International Lesbian and Gay Association (Ilga) reports that 38 African countries still criminalise consensual same-sex sexual activity between adults, and there have been many cases of victimisisation across the continent, with new laws passed to limit gay and lesbian activity. In line with its Constitution, South Africa passed the Civil Union Act in 2006, making it possible for gay and lesbian couples to marry. In 2007, gay and lesbian activists met in Johannesburg, under the aegis of Ilga and local lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersexed (LGBTI) organisations, to discuss lesbian and gay rights and activism in Africa. The editors of a new book, To Have and to Hold: The Making of Same-Sex Marriage in South Africa, interviewed several activists about rights in their countries. These are excerpts from their responses.
    (more…)


    » read article