Sunday Times Books LIVE Community Sign up

Login to Sunday Times Books LIVE

Forgotten password?

Forgotten your password?

Enter your username or email address and we'll send you reset instructions

Sunday Times Books LIVE

Jacana

@ Sunday Times Books LIVE

Archive for the ‘South Africa’ Category

Watch: Tracy Going discusses Brutal Legacy with Leanne Manas on Morning Live

When South Africa’s golden girl of broadcasting, Tracy Going’s battered face was splashed across the media back in the late 1990s, the nation was shocked.

South Africans had become accustomed to seeing Going, glamorous and groomed on television or hearing her resonant voice on Radio Metro and Kaya FM. Sensational headlines of a whirlwind love relationship turned horrendously violent threw the “perfect” life of the household star into disarray. What had started off as a fairy-tale romance with a man who appeared to be everything that Going was looking for – charming, handsome and successful – had quickly descended into a violent, abusive relationship.

“As I stood before him all I could see were the lies, the disappearing for days without warning, the screaming, the threats, the terror, the hostage-holding, the keeping me up all night, the dragging me through the house by my hair, the choking, the doors locked around me, the phones disconnected, the isolation, the fear and the uncertainty.”

The rosy love cloud burst just five months after meeting her “Prince Charming” when she staggered into the local police station, bruised and battered. A short relationship became a two-and-a-half-year legal ordeal played out in the public eye. In mesmerising detail, Going takes us through the harrowing court process – a system seeped in injustice – her decline into depression, the immediate collapse of her career due to the highly public nature of her assault and the decades-long journey to undo the psychological damages in the search for safety and the reclaiming of self.

The roots of violence form the backdrop of the book, tracing Going’s childhood on a plot in Brits, laced with the unpredictable violence of an alcoholic father who regularly terrorised the family with his fists of rage.

“I was ashamed of my father, the drunk. If he wasn’t throwing back the liquid in the lounge then he’d be finding comfort and consort in his cans at the golf club. With that came the uncertainty as I lay in my bed and waited for him to return. I would lie there holding my curtain tight in my small hand. I would pull the fabric down, almost straight, forming a strained sliver and I would peer into the blackness, unblinking. It seemed I was always watching and waiting. Sometimes I searched for satellites between the twinkles of light, but mostly the fear in my tummy distracted me.”

Brilliantly penned, this highly skilled debut memoir, is ultimately uplifting in the realisation that healing is a lengthy and often arduous process and that self-forgiveness and acceptance is essential in order to fully embrace life.

Tracy recently discussed why she decided on writing her story, growing up with an abusive father, and the humiliation she faced in court with her former colleague, Leanne Manas, on SABC:

Book details

  • Brutal Legacy: A Memoir by Tracy Going
    EAN: 9781928420125
    Find this book with BOOK Finder!

  • » read article

    An Image in a Mirror is a richly told and deeply intimate African story about the becoming of two young women

    ‘Strange, how humans desire to see themselves in a mirror image: staring back from the glass, their parts reversed, but their colours reflected.’

    Achen and Nyakale: twin sisters, separated from childhood to inherit different destinies.

    In the hope of inheriting a better life, a mother makes the heartwrenching decision to send one child, Nyakale, to South Africa to be raised by her well-off sister, the child’s aunt, who has no children of her own. The other child, Achen, stays in Uganda to be raised by their mother in a village.

    An Image in a Mirror is a richly told and deeply intimate African story about the becoming of two young women, who are, the same as much as they are different.

    When the sisters, at the age of twenty-two, finally cross their respective worlds to meet, how mirrored will each feel about the other?

    Heralding a new female voice in fiction, An Image in a Mirror is a profound debut novel.
     
     
     
    Ijangolet S Ogwang was born in Kenya to Ugandan parents and raised South African, more specifically in a small town in the Eastern Cape called Butterworth. She is most passionate about women empowerment and the development of Africa. She co-founded Good-Hair and works as an analyst for Edge Growth, a company focused on growing small businesses in South Africa. Between this and “adulting” she makes up stories.

    Book details


    » read article

    The Dinaane Debut Fiction Award: Call for Submissions

    If you are an aspiring author and want the chance to get published, then this is the opportunity you have been waiting for.

    For the past 14 years, first as the European Union Literary Award and now as The Dinaane Debut Fiction Award, the submission process has unearthed great new South African literary talent. The books that have been published under this award have reflected the many strands of conversation that are woven together in the common language of fiction. The latest winner, Selling LipService by Tammy Baikie, is longlisted for this year’s Barry Ronge Fiction Prize.

    This year, the prize is not only open to South Africans but also citizens of all SADC countries.

    The overall winner, selected by a panel of judges, stands a chance to win R35 000, be published by Jacana Media, get great coverage as a debut author and be part of Exclusive Books’ Homebru campaign.

    The JLF will also present the Kraak Writing Award, dedicated to the memory of Gerald Kraak. Valued at R20 000, it offers mentoring and intensive coaching from a published author, editor or a publishing expert, enabling the author to refine and develop their work further.

    Submissions will be open from the 1 April 2018 to 30 June 2018. Enquiries can be directed to: awards@jacana.co.za.


    » read article

    Born to be Free tells the heart-warming true story of lion expert Gareth Patterson introducing George Adamson’s orphaned lion cubs back into the wild

    When the grand old ‘lion man of Africa’, George Adamson, passed away, the last of his lion cub orphans faced an uncertain future.

    Would the cubs have to spend their entire lives behind bars in a zoo, or would they have a free life in the wild, as George had intended for them?

    Lion expert Gareth Patterson rescues George’s cubs and, by living as a human member of the little pride, Gareth prepares to introduce the young lions back into the wild.

    This heart-warming book tells the true story of lioness Rafiki, her sister, Furaha, and her brother, Batian.

    • Many years ago, it was estimated that some 250 000 lions existed across the continent of Africa. Today it is thought that only 20 000 lions remain. Due to the actions of poachers, trophy hunters and conflict with people because of their livestock, the mighty king of the animals is in real trouble.

    • The title of this book is Born to be Free and that is what all lions and other wild animals should be – free. Free to live their lives in the wild as nature had intended. Rafiki’s story shows how important it is for lions to be free – and that we should protected from harm. The African bush would no longer be the same if all the lions were gone. What would we say to our children’s children if the last lion was gone – forever gone?

    • That is why all of us must hold the lion in our hearts, and do our best to protect Rafiki’s kind.

    ABOUT THE AUTHOR

    Raised in west, east and southern Africa, Gareth’s entire adult life has been dedicated to the greater protection of the African lion and Africa’s elephants. He has written about his life in the wilds in 11 internationally published books, and his story has been broadcasted across the world in documentaries such as In Tribute to George Adamson, Shadows of Gold and Gray and the Animal Planet documentary, The Search for the Knysna Elephants. Patterson was presented with the Nick Steele Memorial Award for the Environmentalist of the Year at the SAB Environmental Media Awards 2016.

    Visit Gareth’s personal website: www.garethpatterson.com
    Visit Sekai’s website (Gareth’s African Environmentalism Group): www.sekaiafrica.com

    PRAISE FOR GARETH PATTERSON

    Last of the Free

    ‘An extraordinary tale of endurance, triumph and tragedy’ – The Times, London.

    ‘… Through it all emerges a character deeply in love with his charges, someone whose passion may well ensure that they are not the last of the free great predators.’ – Kirkus Review

    ‘An extraordinary story.’ – Daily Mail

    ‘A story about hardship, dedication and demanding work … a message that deserves wide readership.’ – Literary Journal ‘It is both heart-warming and heart-rending and I defy you to read it without a tear in your eye.’ – Manchester Evening News

    With My Soul Amongst Lions

    ‘Patterson soldiers on, triumphing over adversities that would have broken lesser men … like Adamson before him, he cannot bear to think of a lion that is not free.’ – The Times, London

    ‘Movingly told … a story of one man’s amazing devotion’. – Today

    ‘His story, tinged with triumph and tragedy in equal measure, is a powerful plea on behalf of all lions.’ – BBC Wildlife magazine

    Book details


    » read article

    When Morning Comes explores the issues of race and culture through the eyes of teenagers on the eve of the Soweto uprising

    It’s 1976 in South Africa.

    Written from the points of view of four young people living in Johannesburg and its black township, Soweto – Zanele, a black female student organiser, Mina, of South Asian background working at her father’s shop, Jack, an Oxford-bound white student, and Thabo, a tsotsi – this book explores the roots of the Soweto Uprising and the edifice of apartheid in a South Africa about to explode.

    In the black township of Soweto, Zanele, who also works as a nightclub singer, is plotting against the apartheid government. The police can’t know. Her mother and sister can’t know. No one can know.

    On the affluent white side of town, Jack Craven plans to spend the last days of his break before university burning miles on his beat-up Mustang, and crashing other people’s parties.

    Their chance meeting changes everything.

    Already a chain of events are in motion: a failed plot, a murdered teacher, a powerful police agent with a vendetta, and a secret network of students across the township. The students will rise. And there will be violence when morning comes.

    Introducing readers to a remarkable young literary talent, When Morning Comes offers an impeccably researched and vivid snapshot of South African society on the eve of the uprising that changed it forever.

    Arushi Raina grew up in Johannesburg, South Africa. So far, she has also lived in Egypt, Nigeria, India, the US, UK and, most recently, Canada. She likes intricate plots, flawed characters, chases, escapes, and sentences that just make you stop and wonder. Besides writing, Arushi enjoys travelling, arguments and long car rides. As a day job, Arushi works as a consultant. One day she’ll explain what that means.

    Book details


    » read article

    Robin Renwick’s account of decline in political leadership in SA explores the influence of the Guptas, the ensuing scandals, and the change our country can expect

    How to Steal a Country describes the vertiginous decline in political leadership in South Africa from Mandela to Zuma and its terrible consequences.

    Robin Renwick’s account reads in parts like a novel – a crime novel – for Sherlock Holmes’s old adversary, Professor Moriarty, the erstwhile Napoleon of Crime, would have been impressed by the ingenuity, audacity and sheer scale of the looting of the public purse, let alone the impunity with which it has been accomplished.

    Based on Renwick’s personal experiences of the main protagonists, it describes the extraordinary influence achieved by the Gupta family for those seeking to do business with state-owned enterprises in South Africa, and the massive amounts earned by Gupta related companies from their associations with them.

    The ensuing scandals have engulfed Bell Pottinger, KPMG, McKinsey and other multinationals. The primary responsibility for this looting of the state, however, rests squarely with President Zuma and key members of his government. But South Africa has succeeded in establishing a genuinely non-racial society full of determined and enterprising people, offering genuine hope for the future.

    These include independent journalists, black and white, who refuse to be silenced, and the judges, who have acted with courage and independence. The book concludes that change will come, either by the ruling party reverting to the values of Mandela and Archbishop Tutu, or by the reckoning it otherwise will face one day.

    Robin Renwick, Baron Renwick of Clifton, is a crossbench peer in the House of Lords. He was ambassador to South Africa during the period leading to the release of Nelson Mandela. He subsequently served as ambassador to the United States.

    Book details


    » read article

    And our sunshine noir author for March is … C.M. Elliott!

    A new month calls for a new sunshine noir author sending shivers down the spines of local thriller fans…

    This month, the co-author of the popular Detective Kubu series, Michael Sears, had the opportunity to interview C.M. Elliott for The Big Thrill – the magazine for international thriller writers.

    Sibanda and the Death’s Head Moth
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     

    C.M. Elliott, author of the popular Sibanda-series.

     

    Here’s what the two thriller aficionados chatted about:

    C. M. Elliott (everyone calls her Scotty, but she says the reason why makes too long of a story) writes a series of mystery/thrillers set in Zimbabwe near the Hwange National Park. She certainly has the perfect background for it, having spent 40 years in Zimbabwe with her game-ranger husband pioneering a tourism business based in and around the national park. She says she lived in the park continuously for 20 years “in an assortment of tents, tree-houses and bush dwellings, dodging a hodgepodge of charging elephants, rhino, buffalo and a rather angry spitting cobra” before moving to Bulawayo. Along the way, she has won literary prizes and awards, and the books have just been optioned for a TV series.

    The first novel, Sibanda and the Rainbird, featuring the redoubtable Detective Inspector Jabulani Sibanda, was published in 2013 to an enthusiastic reception. It was followed two years later by Sibanda and the Death’s Head Moth, and last year Sibanda and the Black Sparrowhawk was released. The books have a wonderful sense of place as a backdrop for the gritty crimes and action.

    It’s clear from your writing that you have a deep knowledge of, and affection for, the people of Matabeleland in Zimbabwe. How did you come to know the area and the people there so well?

    I’ve lived in Matabeleland for 40 years and most of that time has been in rural locations. I’m fascinated by people and culture and the Ndebele are a particularly warm and welcoming nation, always smiling despite recent adversities. It’s hard not to admire and store away instances of such stoicism, good humor, ingenuity, and tradition.

    What motivated you to write a series of detective novels set in Gubu, a fictitious small town close to the national park?

    When I started this creative journey, I hadn’t a clue what to write about, but I knew the setting was going to be the African bush. It’s no secret that Gubu is the nom de plume for Dete, a village near the park that I know really well.

    Sitting in front of a blank computer screen, I set myself the exercise of writing short stories in as many different genres as I could think of. My first attempt was crime, a serendipitous pick. I never progressed to sci fi, romance, or historical et al, because I became completely engaged by my characters. They wouldn’t let go and led me on a merry dance through an entire novel!

    While I was reading the book, President Mugabe was deposed after 37 years ruling Zimbabwe. Where do you think the country is going in the future under the new president?

    Onwards and upwards. Anyone who watched the peaceful transition in Zimbabwe, where up to a million people took to the streets with no incidence of looting or violence and no arrests, could not fail to be moved by the determination and unfettered joy of the people. With a ground swell like that behind him our new president must succeed.

    Continue reading their conversation here.
     

    Sibanda and the Rainbird

    Book details

     
     
    Sibanda and the Death’s Head Moth

     
     
     

    Sibanda and the Black Sparrow Hawk


    » read article

    Jacana Media awarded Bologna Book Fair’s ‘Children’s Publisher of the Year’

    Jacana Media is proud to announce that they have been awarded the Bologna Book Fair’s ‘Children’s Publisher of the Year’ prize in the African category.

    The prize is for “publishers who have most distinguished themselves for their creative and publishing excellence over the year, showing originality as well as professional and intellectual skills” and Jacana Media congratulates the other shortlisted publishers Boustany’s Publishing House, Sub-Saharian Publishers, Protea Boekhuis and Ruisseaux d’Afrique.

    The prize is run by the fair in association with the Italian Publishers’ Association and rewards the best children’s publishers in six areas of the world: Africa, Central and South America, North America, Asia, Europe and Oceania.

    “We are honoured to be recognised with this award,” says Carol Broomhall, publisher at Jacana Media. “We work hard to bring our books to a primarily South African audience and it is heartening when the quality of our publications is recognised internationally and we are thrilled to be so acknowledged.”

    The winners in the other regions are:

    OneTree House – New Zealand (Oceania)
    Éditions D’eux – Canada (North America)
    Ediciones Tecolote – Mexico (Central and South America)
    Wydawnictwo Dwie Siostry Publishers – Poland (Europe)
    Fukuinkan Shoten Publishers – Japan (Asia)


    » read article

    Do you want to write your memoir? Melinda Ferguson shares the know-how with Sara-Jayne King…

    Melinda Ferguson, the author of memoirs Smacked, Hooked, and Crashed, is launching an online memoir writing course, ‘The Magic of Making a Start’.

    Ferguson, an acclaimed publisher to boot, has been hosting writing workshops in both Cape Town and Joburg for the past 18 months.

    She recently was a guest on fellow memoirist (Killing Karoline) and radio host Sara-Jayne King’s Cape Talk programme, during which the two discussed her digital debut.

    Give it a listen!

    Smacked

    Book details

     
    Hooked
     

     
    Crashed

     
     
     

    Killing Karoline


    » read article

    David Bristow received 174 rejection slips before Jacana published Running Wild. The Daily Maverick asked why he persevered…

    Running WildFollowing in the footsteps of Jock of the Bushveld, Running Wild is an African story for all ages. It is a tale of resilience, of courage and endurance, a book that will uplift, enrich and warm every lover of the African bush.

    The story of Zulu is based on the life of a real stallion that lived on the Mashatu Game Reserve. The versions of the story of Zulu are about as numerous as the people who recount them. The horse and the myth were at times indistinguishable. This account of his life has been stitched together from all those stories.

    In February 2000, tropical Cyclone Leon-Eline resulted in a storm so severe that the horses of Mashatu broke out of their enclosure and roamed wild and free for days before returning. Zulu was the only one that did not return. He was thought to be lost to the scourges of the Bushveld.

    Years pass before Zulu is discovered to be not only alive and well, but running as the lead stallion of a herd of wild zebras. He is recaptured and returned to the safari stables as a much bolder and wiser stallion – knowledge he passes on to the other horses as well as the humans of Limpopo Valley.

    David Bristow has a degree in journalism. He is one of South Africa’s first full-time travel photojournalists and was the editor of Getaway magazine. David has written more than 20 books about Africa, taking a three-year sabbatical mid-career to earn a master’s degree in environmental sciences.

    As well as travelling from Antarctica to Alaska, Hillbrow to the Himalayas, he has ridden horse safaris in South Africa, Zimbabwe, Botswana and Kenya. David now lives on a lake close to the sea near Cape Town with his partner, one cat, two surfboards, three canoes and four bicycles. He has three children and a grand one.

    Upon hearing that Bristow received 174 rejection slips before Jacana okay’d his manuscript, the Daily Maverick’s Tiara Walters was intrigued as to why exactly David didn’t just. give. up. Here’s why…

    DM: I don’t understand. Why not just self-publish after rejection slip number 83, for argument’s sake?

    DB: I really believed in the story, simple as that. I just had to convince someone else. As soon as Jacana heard the premise, they jumped at it, smart people.

    With regards to self-publishing, or not in this case, it was about shelf space and numbers. If your book isn’t housewives’ porn or young adult fantasy, you don’t want to go that route unless you are serious about selling books. Making them is the easy part. This is not my first book by a long way so it was not what they call a “vanity-publishing” exercise. But it was my first paperback, so it needed to be a commercial success. I’ve thrown a lot of marketing resources at it, from serious media launches to talks at book clubs.

    I think the story of Zulu has the potential of becoming a modern-day equivalent of Jock of the Bushveld. It’s the rollicking, true story of an African stallion that bolts from his stable during the cyclonic floods of 2000, joins a dazzle of zebras in Mashatu Game Reserve and, remarkably, rises to the position of lead stallion.

    DM: So what was the problem, then? Were you not photogenic enough? I heard this might be a thing in the unsparing world of contemporary publishing now.

    DB: Yup, ugly as original sin. My girlfriend calls me OS (although that might just be os) (os n. Afrikaans for bovine male. Sometimes used for pulling vehicles or carrying things). But also publishing is like that well-trotted-out saying about capitalism: it’s a kak system, but it’s the best we’ve got. Which I guess is my way of saying they know nothing. The accountants and marketing people make all the decisions. And they think only in boxes (very small ones usually), like, does this book fit neatly into one of our sure-selling categories?

    DM: Is Zulu the only horse ever known to have “gone” zebra? Did you look for other, um, “horsebra” stories? Perhaps it’s not entirely fanciful to picture a dazzle of zebra running wild through the Namib, displaying suspiciously desert horse-like traits.

    DB: In the wilds, yes, this is unique. In captivity zebras and horses, as well as zebras and donkeys, have been crossed. Crosses were common amusements in Victorian circuses, but it was always a zebra male and female horse (zorses). The other way around is not known to ever have occurred. Not even the equine scientists could tell me why.

    Continue reading their conversation HERE.

    Book details


    » read article