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Archive for the ‘Video’ Category

“Not allowing myself to be classified by others has been crucial in working out my own identity” – Sara-Jayne King on Killing Karoline

Killing Karoline deals with important topical issues relating to adoption, identity, race, mental health and addiction.

Born Karoline King in 1980 in Johannesburg South Africa, Sara-Jayne (as she will later be called by her adoptive parents) is the result of an affair, illegal under apartheid’s Immorality Act, between a white British woman and a black South African man. Her story reveals the shocking lie created to cover up the forbidden relationship, and the hurried overseas adoption of the illegitimate baby, born during one of history’s most inhumane and destructive regimes.

Killing Karoline follows the journey of the baby girl (categorised as ‘white’ under South Africa’s race classification system) who is raised in a leafy, middle-class corner of the South of England by a white couple. It takes the reader through her formative years, a difficult adolescence and into adulthood, as Sara-Jayne (Karoline) seeks to discover who she is and where she came from.

Plagued by questions surrounding her own identity and unable to ‘fit in’ Sara-Jayne begins to turn on herself. She eventually returns to South Africa, after 26 years, to face her demons. There she is forced to face issues of identity, race, rejection and belonging beyond that which she could ever have imagined. She must also face her birth family, who in turn must confront what happens when the baby you kill off at a mere six weeks old returns from the dead.

Sara-Jayne King is a mixed-race South African/British journalist and radio presenter whose career spans over a decade and has taken her across the globe in search of remarkable stories and fascinating characters. While studying for an LLB degree in the UK, Sara-Jayne realised her passion lay elsewhere and, after graduating, she went on to complete a Master’s in Journalism in 2004. Her career began as a junior journalist in local radio in London and since then has included roles in the Middle East and Africa, most recently as a senior editor for news channel eNCA and presenter for Primedia’s talk radio station Cape Talk.

Here Sara discusses the ramifications of apartheid, South Africans’ innate need to classify, and the necessity of not allowing herself to be defined by others for 1001 South African Stories:

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Chwayita Ngamlana on her debut novel, abusive relationships and gender-based violence

What is Sex? Sex is a humid climate. What is Desire? Desire is snow. What is Loneliness? Loneliness is a badger trying to figure out why it looks different to an otter. What is Obsession?Obsession is trying to fix a broken chair without realising that the chair is just bent at the knees and that’s how it was born. What is a Dyke? A dyke is an intricate, indecipherable encryption.

Chwayita Ngamlana, in her electric debut book, explores the above questions through her characters as they struggle through the volatility of love, the danger of not knowing themselves and
discovering their voice in the world.

The story follows the characters, Shay and Sip, who are very different in class, style, character and education. Shay is a journalism student working part time as an intern on a site that has no clear sense of direction. Sip is an unemployed varsity drop out and ex-gang member.

Their vastly different lives make it challenging for them to be the kind of couple they so desperately want to be. Unable to get themselves untangled from the web they’ve created, Shay and Sip use money, other people and sex to fix things, but is this enough?

Ngamlama has created a world that is somewhere between the present day and a sub-world of delusion. The reader will want to watch both story and characters unravel. This book will touch anyone who has lost themselves or their loved ones to unhealthy, destructive relationships.

Chwayita Ngamlana was born and raised in Grahamstown. She is an only child who found comfort and companionship in reading and writing from the age of 10. She has a degree in music and has her master’s in Creative Writing. This is her debut novel – and it won’t be the last.

Here Chwayita discusses her book, abusive relationships, and contemporary issues in South Africa, including corrective rape, on SABC:

If I Stay Right Here

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Watch Malebo Sephodi’s TED Talk on the importance of self-care as tool of liberation

Upon encountering historian Laurel Thatcher Ulrich’s quote, ‘well-behaved women seldom make history’, Malebo Sephodi knew that she was tired of everyone else having a say on who and what she should be.

Appropriating this quote, Malebo boldly renounces societal expectations placed on her as a black woman and shares her journey towards misbehaviour.

According to Malebo, it is the norm for a black woman to live in a society that prescribes what it means to be a well-behaved woman. Acting like this prescribed woman equals good behaviour. But what happens when a black woman decides to live her own life and becomes her own form of who she wants to be? She is often seen as misbehaving.

Miss-Behave challenges society’s deep-seated beliefs about what it means to be an obedient woman. In this book, Malebo tracks her journey on a path towards achieving total autonomy and self-determinism.

Miss-Behave will challenge, rattle and occasionally cause you to scream ‘yassss, yassss, yassss’ at various intervals.

Here, Malebo discusses the complex relationship women have with themselves, societal pressure, the marginilisation of women’s bodies, balancing your domestic life with your professional life, and the importance of self-care as tool of liberation:

Miss Behave

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Watch: Malebo Sephodi discusses her memoir Miss Behave (Yasss!)

Upon encountering historian Laurel Thatcher Ulrich’s quote, ‘well-behaved women seldom make history’, Malebo Sephodi knew that she was tired of everyone else having a say on who and what she should be.

Appropriating this quote, Malebo boldly renounces societal expectations placed on her as a black woman and shares her journey towards misbehaviour.

According to Malebo, it is the norm for a black woman to live in a society that prescribes what it means to be a well-behaved woman. Acting like this prescribed woman equals good behaviour.
But what happens when a black woman decides to live her own life and becomes her own form of who she wants to be? She is often seen as misbehaving.

Miss Behave challenges society’s deep-seated beliefs about what it means to be an obedient woman. In this book, Malebo tracks her journey on a path towards achieving total autonomy and self-determinism.

Miss Behave will challenge, rattle and occasionally cause you to scream ‘yassss, yassss, yassss’ at various intervals.


 
Miss Behave

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Watch: Hagen Engler visits Bridge Books to chat about his new book, In the Maid’s Room

In the Maid's RoomHagen Engler recently visited Bridge Books, a new independent bookstore in Johannesburg, to chat about his new novel, In the Maid’s Room.

Engler starts with a spoken word poem called “When talking, voting, swallowing your pride and patient hoping fails”:

The Last Poets, of Chuck D or not, were not right in this case. A revolution had been televised, since first the flu of freedom flew, as such things do tend to do, through our fragile neighbourhood.

Even we, freed before though we might have been, are not immune. Are those complaints, those demands of our North African semi-brethren, any different to ours? Do our youth have prospects any better than the million men in Tahrir square? Are their certificates any less useless? Less meaningless? Has economics failed them any less than it has us?

Are we not smoking cigarettes of silly, privileged apathy in flammable frustrated nations suffused with fumes of anger, crushed hopes, deferred dreams and any-minute-now igniting points?

In the Maid’s Room is set in Port Elizabeth, and tells the story of Disco, a South African hipster who’s battling to make the rent. He moves into the maid’s room on his property and rents out the main house to Sizwe.

Sizwe starts dating Disco’s ex-girlfriend, and get the media job Disco had his eye on.

“Disco’s this guy who feels like everything he’s entitled to is being taken from him, and he’s trying to deal with it,” Engler says. “Which is probably a quest that a lot of people are on.”

Watch the video:

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Betrayed by a friend and sold into human trafficking in Joburg: Grizelda Grootboom’s Exit!

Exit!Presenting Exit! – the story of Grizelda Grootboom’s life of prostitution and her ultimate escape from it all:

How does one enter an 18-year hell of drugs and prostitution? Through one of the world’s most evil and least-known criminal networks; human trafficking. Grootboom was one such victim, betrayed by a trusted friend and sold into the syndicate.

Click on the link below to watch Grootboom talk about her life experiences:

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Hers is not a one dimensional story; Grootboom offers us a layered South African narrative. Filled with complexity and painfully honest in its telling, we begin to understand the hopeless resignation that envelops so many women forced into this position. If you have been molested from the age of nine, if your whole life has been a never-ending story of poverty, family abandonment and dislocation, then when you find yourself trapped in the worst possible situation, the only way out seems to be to resign yourself to your plight.

But Grizelda found an Exit!

Right on time, the book arrives as government’s new national strategic plan for HIV prevention, care and treatment for sex workers is announced in March 2016. This is an issue that Grizelda deals with in her book.

About the author

Grizelda Grootboom is an activist against human trafficking who supports fellow survivors undergoing rehabilitation. She is currently working at Embrace Dignity, an NPO based in Cape Town. It is part of a growing global movement working to restore dignity for all people by advocating for law reform and public education to address commercial sexual exploitation and human trafficking.

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Racist Notions and People Like Penny Sparrow: Watch Panashe Chigumadzi’s TEDxTalk, “A New Self-identity for Africans”

Social media has been up in arms, and rightfully so, after a racist comment made by KZN estate agent Penny Sparrow in which she openly referred to black people as monkeys on her Facebook page:

 

Sparrow’s name has been trending on Twitter all day, with calls for action against blatant racists like her:


 

Sweet MedicineThe conversation that has been sparked by Sparrow’s offensive comment, and other similar social media posts, has reminded us of a point made by Sweet Medicine author Panashe Chigumadzi during the 2013 TEDxJohannesburg gathering.

In a lecture titled “A new self-identity for Africans”, Chigumadzi called for the “deprogramming of the colonised mind with programming”, reflecting on the racist notions that exist in post-apartheid South African media and society. South Africans, or more specifically black South Africans, suffer from a 300 year old negative colonial narrative that has shaped not only how the world sees them, but in many ways also how they see themselves – as inferior citizens of the world. Case in point: Sparrow’s comment (and the words of those who ‘defend’ her).

Analysing results from a media monitoring project, Chigumadzi looked at messaging and the control of African media to see how black people are projected. Racist notions that exist include the following:

1. Blacks are criminals
2. Blacks are irrational
3. People act according to their ethnic identity

Chigumadzi defines the concept ‘sterotype threat’ and makes a call for Africans to take back the stereotypes that exist about them; she urges black people to exercise control over the way in which they are perceived.

Watch the video to see examples of how that has and can be done through media, including how to speak up when negative racial notions are encouraged by individuals and media organisations:

Let’s redefine what it means to be black and African and reaffirm ourselves in our identity. Let’s deprogram our colonised minds, with good, compelling content.

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Read more about Panashe Chigumadzi and her magnificent debut novel:

 

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“I Had to Learn to Close My Ears” – Melinda Ferguson Talks About Her Memoir, Crashed (Video)

CrashedJennifer Sanasie chatted to Melinda Ferguson on News24 recently about her new book, Crashed: How Trashing a Ferrari Saved My Life.

In 2013 Ferguson took a R3.2 million Ferrari California out on a test drive for the day, celebrating 14 years of sobriety. Minutes before returning it she crashed the luxury vehicle – an event that served as a catalyst for a number of life-changing events.

“Later I realised this crash was almost an inevitable thing, that I needed to take stock of my life and what I’d been doing and where I’d been going in my life, and so the crash, I suppose, is symbolic of just a whole lot of stuff gets crashed and then slowly gets rebuilt again,” Ferguson tells Sanasie. The aftermath was quite traumatic, with a lot of rumours and gossip about the reason for it.

“I had to learn to close my ears,” Ferguson says. “I felt very victimised, I must say, by all of the stuff and unable to engage with it.” However, owning what happened and writing about it gave her a sense of peace and closure with this chapter of her life.

Ferguson also chats about the things that were not right before the crash, how she worked through the post-traumatic stress after the accident and why she decided to write a book about the things that transpired afterwards.

Watch the video:

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I Wanted Piggy Boy’s Blues to Glorify the Eastern Cape: Nakhane Toure on 7 Years of Writing (Video)

Piggy Boy's BluesPolity’s Sane Dhlamini recently chatted to Nakhane Touré about his debut novel, Piggy Boy’s Blues.

In the interview Touré, who studied literature at Wits University, speaks about his dream of being an academic: “Initially I actually wanted to be a writer and I wanted to play music on the weekends and be one of those cool lecturers.”

A lack of funding, however, forced Touré to leave university, and this is when the music really started to happen. “I threw myself into the music because I had nothing else to lose.” That was seven years ago, during which time Touré didn’t stop working on Piggy Boy’s Blues.

“Writing literature is very slow, and very lonely,” Touré said about the process and his journey back to the Eastern Cape to finish the book. “I needed to go back to the Eastern Cape to write about it authentically and honestly,” he said. “I wanted the book to be a glorification of that space, because that space has gone through so much.”

Watch the video, in which Touré explains how and why he never stopped writing:

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Anton Kannemeyer vertel wat hy wil bereik met satiriese kuns (Video)

Pappa in DoubtAnton Kannemeyer het onlangs met kykNET se aktualiteitsprogram Flits gesels oor sy jongste kunsuitstalling, E is for Exhibition.

Kannemeyer, wie se jongste publikasie Pappa in Doubt vroeër vanjaar by Jacana verskyn het, gesels openlik oor sy werk, inspirasie en die drama wat dikwels met sy satires gepaard gaan. Hy vertel ook meer oor die strokiesprent oor Nelson Mandela en deel sy persoonlike Madiba-verhaal. Oor wat hy met satiriese kuns wil bereik, sê Kannemeyer:

“Ek voel ek moet doen die werk wat ek doen. Ek wil graag die reg hê om te sê wat ek wil sê, ek word deur die konstitusie beskerm om dit te doen. As satirikus maak ek die werk, ek sit die werk daar uit.

“Mense het hul opinies, ek dink hulle het hul absolute reg op opinies – as hulle dink dis verskriklik dan is dit hulle reg, as hulle dink dis wonderlik dan is dit hulle reg en as hulle wil praat daaroor is ek baie bly want dit is wat ek wil bereik met satiriese kuns. Ek wil hê mense móét praat daaroor.”

Kyk na die video:

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